Blog | Helpful Tessmer Tips | Tessmer Law Firm
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Tessmer Tips / 28.08.2015

Keep all appointments with your medical providers. Explain to your doctors, in detail, any problems you continue to experience as a result of your injuries. This ensures your medical record is complete, which is important when it comes time to negotiate a settlement or go to trial.   DO keep your final appointment with your doctor. This is when your doctor will usually provide you with a ‘permanency rating’ if your injury is permanent. Your attorney must have this information before settlement negotiations can begin.   Don't be too eager to settle. The claims adjuster you will be dealing with will want immediate resolution....

Tessmer Tips / 27.08.2015

In a personal injury case, documentation is important. Take photos of your injuries. Also, include recent photos of yourself taken before the injuries occurred.  Keep a journal about your injuries and medical attention. Be precise about everything, including the daily extent of your pain. Even the smallest of points is significant information.   Keep a file of every form of correspondence with every involved medical person relating to your injury, including e-mails. Save all of your medical-related receipts. This includes prescriptions, special equipment (crutches, walkers, canes), special foods, and co-payments.   Don’t forget to document any travel expenses for your medical appointments. Maintain documentation...

Tessmer Tips / 25.08.2015

Consider hiring a personal injury lawyer to represent you. They understand the laws and the injury claims process, allowing them to use their experience to your advantage. A good lawyer can even help you further when it comes to documenting personal injury expenses. This way you can focus on healing rather than negotiating.   When dealing with a personal injury claim, you may be asked about prior medical conditions and current medical care. These are used to help establish damages. You may also be asked for details about how the accident happened, what you did and your current situation. Anything related to your health...

Tessmer Tips / 24.08.2015

How do you know if you have a legitimate personal injury claim? Only a qualified lawyer can tell if your circumstances are likely to result in an award. However, most personal injury cases share these common elements:   You have been injured either directly or indirectly (or you are the legal representative of someone who was injured). Someone else was at fault, either wholly or partially. Your injuries can be documented. The person or organization at fault is capable of being sued (in some special cases, laws have been enacted to protect certain entities from lawsuits.)   If you have been injured, seek medical...

Tessmer Tips / 23.08.2015

It's a beautiful day out.  You are in a great mood, on your way home from work, singing along to the radio.  Suddenly -- WHAM!  You are hit by another vehicle.  And just like that, your life is changed because you are hurt and can't work.  The medical bills start to pile up and your household bills fall behind.  It was not even your fault.   According to the Texas Department of Transportation, in 2013 there were 232,041 people injured in car accidents in the state of Texas.  1 person was killed every 2 hours and 36 minutes.  Those are staggering statistics.   Stay...

Tessmer Tips / 21.08.2015

The medical benefits program available to active duty service members, retirees, and family members is called TRICARE. After a divorce, a service member’s children continue to qualify for TRICARE. Unfortunately for civilian spouses, unless you meet some pretty stringent requirements, you will no longer qualify once you are divorced. You get to keep your TRICARE coverage only if all of the following things are true:   You do not qualify for health insurance through your own employment. You have not remarried. You meet the requirements of the 20/20/20 rule, meaning that you were married for at least 20 years, your spouse...