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Tessmer Tips / 03.02.2016

Divorcing parents of special needs children should determine which parent will make educational decisions, or how disagreements between the parents will be resolved.   Children with disabilities should be afforded the same opportunities as children without disabilities when it involves educational programming and the ability to be as independent as possible. Families often struggle to overcome barriers that serve to exclude a child with a disability in school and social settings. To promote inclusion, parents must work together to seek opportunities for the child to participate in school and social events.   The task of finding appropriate educational supports is often a challenge for...

Tessmer Tips / 02.02.2016

Divorcing parents of special needs children require customized visitation agreements that address transitions between homes.   If you do not know, for example, that transitions can be very difficult for persons with autism, you would not understand why a visitation schedule in which the child sleeps in one parent’s house for a couple days and then the other parent’s house for a couple days would be a nightmare for this child. If the lawyers and judge do not realize that a 200 pound teenager with cerebral palsy requires special lifting and transfer equipment which is only located at one parent’s house, a...

Tessmer Tips / 01.02.2016

Every year, parents of a million American children get divorced. This is most difficult for children with special needs. When custody and support orders involve children with special needs, decisions regarding “the best interests of the child” become even more complex.   Clients who have children with special needs should focus on resolving certain critical issues, some of which we will discuss this week at our Tessmer Tips blog.   Our attorneys and staff have experience dealing with cases that involve special needs children, including divorce and guardianship. If we can assist you with additional information please contact us at 210-368-9708.  ...

Tessmer Tips / 15.01.2016

#1 - Secure several Certified Copies of your Final Decree.  Review all paperwork carefully with your attorney and be sure you understand all that is required of you in the final agreement.   #2 - Take care to change any personal and/or financial information needed.  For example: open new checking and savings accounts, update any automatic payments taken from your accounts, change your passwords to all online accounts and your email, open a new safety deposit box in your name only.   #3 - Revoke any Powers of Attorney naming your ex and make new ones.  Create a new Estate Plan (Will, Medical Directives,...

Tessmer Tips / 11.01.2016

I was in a fender bender.  Now what?  A minor auto collision with no injuries involved is usually not difficult to resolve.  However, the more knowledge you have, the better off you will be!  So here are some tips on what to expect if this happens to you.   In a minor collision with no injuries, the police may not make a report.  The police may not even respond at all, especially if the wreck occurred in a parking lot or on private property.  It is vital that you get the name, contact info and insurance info for the other driver.  Take...

Tessmer Tips / 08.01.2016

  Over 95% of all divorce cases settle before trial, so consider mediation instead of taking an adversarial position.  If mediation is not for you, there are other options - such as collaborative divorce or arbitration.   Before you file, think about you what you want the ultimate outcome to be.  The best decisions on whether to file, how to choose an attorney, etc. can be made only after you know where you want to be when it is over.  Set your intentions by writing a mission statement.  Outline your priorities for when your divorce is over.  For example, if your #1 priority is...