Tessmer Law Firm, Author at Tessmer Law Firm - Page 3 of 30
1
archive,paged,author,author-tessmer,author-1,paged-3,author-paged-3,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,,qode-theme-ver-13.9,qode-theme-bridge,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-6.2.0,vc_responsive

Author: Tessmer Law Firm

Parents have the duty to support their child, which includes providing the child with clothing, food, medical and dental care, shelter, and education. This duty to support is not limited to providing only the bare necessities. The duty to support is imposed on parents when the child is born. The duty exists regardless of whether a court has ordered a parent to pay child support. The duty to support ends when any of the following occurs: • Minority ends: -  When the child turns 18; -  When high school ends, if the child is still enrolled when he/she turns 18; • Parent-child relationship terminated: •...

Last month, Heather Tessmer wrote an article featured in MD News Magazine. The article focused on what type of professionals doctors need to protect their assets, family and business. Read the article below: You need a Professional… If you’re reading this, chances are, you yourself, are a professional. Maybe, more than a professional, you’re a specialist. If you consider yourself a specialist in your field, you understand that it takes years of training and education to reach that level in your career. You can also understand why you need other professionals on your team to help you plan for and protect your...

In a divorce, the most common professionals that come to mind are family law attorneys.   When a divorce is complex or there are high-value assets involved, there may be a need for other trained professionals. Here is a glossary of some of the professionals that could assist:   Divorce Coach Divorce coaches help clients set and achieve goals, make decisions and transition to life after the divorce. A divorce coach is not a therapist or a counselor, although he or she might be licensed as one. A divorce coach is not an attorney and does not offer legal advice.   Custody Evaluator Custody evaluators are court-appointed mental health professionals who...

  Collaborative or traditional divorce - how do you know which is right for you?   Divorce comes with a big price tag, financially and emotionally. For couples willing to cooperate with each other, a collaborative divorce may an option.   Here are some direct comparisons between collaborative and traditional divorce to help you decide which is best.   ·        A collaborative divorce begins with the couple signing an agreement that they will cooperate, be open and honest and work together to resolve their issues.   ·        A traditional divorce begins with the filing of a lawsuit – one spouse against the other. The responding spouse will be served...

What is a collaborative divorce?   In a regular divorce case, the couple is on opposite sides. There may be a lot of fighting, disagreement and unwillingness to settle things. This type of divorce case often ends up in court.   Some divorcing couples may be able to settle things easily. These couples can agree on issues like child custody, child support, and division of property. There is no need for the court to settle their issues. In a situation like this, a couple should consider a collaborative divorce.   Collaborative divorce is a process that uses mediation and negotiation to settle the issues.   It takes two...

8 Tips to Start 2017 With the Right Foot 1.     Don’t drink and drive. The new year arrives with celebrations and fun. Be safe! Designate a driver, call a taxi or get an Uber. 2017 dawns with bright promise – don’t start off with a DWI.   2.     Review your Will and Estate Plan.   Did 2016 come with any life changes? Did you get married or remarried? Have a baby or adopt a child? Did you divorce? These are just some of the major events that make updating a Will necessary. Check your Powers of Attorney and Medical Directives, too. If you don’t have a...

Now that you have decided to create your Estate Plan, you want to be sure you cover all your bases and leave nothing out.   What questions should you ask yourself and what things should you be thinking about?   An experienced Estate Planning attorney will help you go over various scenarios and be certain you have everything covered in all the right documents. While not a comprehensive list, here are some of the things you should consider.   1.     What are my assets? What are my debts? Make a list and gather the information and documentation needed to identify all your assets and debts. Some accounts...

  Heather Tessmer has been elected to membership in the Fellows of the Texas Bar Foundation.   Fellows of the Foundation are selected for their outstanding professional achievements and their demonstrated commitment to the improvement of the justice system throughout the state of Texas. Election is a mark of distinction and recognition of Heather's contributions to the legal profession.   Selection as a Fellow is restricted to members of the State Bar of Texas. Each year, one-third of one percent of State Bar members are invited to become Fellows. Once nominees are selected, they must be elected by the Texas Bar Foundation Board of Trustees.   The...

In our last article, we gave you an overview of a basic Estate Plan, the different documents that can be included and what they do.   Today, we are discussing probate, what happens when someone dies with a will and when it might be better to have a living trust.   What is probate?   Probate is the court process that takes place after someone dies. During probate, the decedent’s will is proven valid, then his or her property gets identified, inventoried, appraised and distributed after any payments to debts and/or taxes. Probate typically involves paperwork and court appearances by attorneys. Legal and court fees are...