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Author: Tessmer Law Firm

On November 30th, Heather and some of the Tessmer Law Firm family attended the graduation ceremony for the 2017 LEAD Academy's inaugural class.  Tessmer Law Firm's associate attorney, Ms. Christine Rudy was among the honored graduates in attendance.  LEAD's website says, "The LEAD Academy is a year-long leadership-development program born out of a desire to assist women attorneys in attaining the highest level of success in their firms and organizations, in their communities, and in the legal profession."   Congratulations, Christine!...

Heather appeared in the Sep/Oct 2017 edition of San Antonio Woman, along with financial advisor, Diane Moore, and divorce coach, Robin Brown.  They have teamed up for a 4-hour workshop called “Divorce Workshop for Women,” which provides a roadmap to navigate the divorce process and make everything go as smoothly as possible when a woman is faced with this situation.  This quarterly workshop is held around San Antonio area locations....

  Heather Clement Tessmer Selected in 2017 Thomson Reuters    Heather was selected as a “Super Lawyer 2017” for excellence in practice. This annual list of top attorneys is sponsored by SuperLawyers.com and is bestowed on attorneys who have attained a high-degree of peer recognition and professional achievement.  ...

In 2000, the U.S. Supreme Court issued its opinion in Troxel v. Granville, a case involving the visitation rights of grandparents. Troxel held that a parent has a fundamental right to decide who has access to a child. It was found that a parent who is “fit” is presumed to make decisions – including the decision to prevent a grandparent from contacting a child - that serves the child’s best interest. This “fit parent” presumption can be rebutted if the grandparent shows, by a preponderance of the evidence, that the parent was not fit or that denial of access by...

Typically, parents who are divorcing in Texas are appointed as Joint Managing Conservators of the children.  This means that both parents have specific rights and duties when it comes to the children.  These rights and duties include:   • physical possession of the child, • directing the moral and religious training • designating the primary residence, • consenting to medical, dental, and psychological treatment, • receiving child support, • consenting to marriage or joining the armed forces, • education decisions, and many more.   Joint Managing Conservators are also awarded possession and access schedules.  The most common is the Standard Possession Order where the non-primary parent has the children on...

Parents have the duty to support their child, which includes providing the child with clothing, food, medical and dental care, shelter, and education. This duty to support is not limited to providing only the bare necessities. The duty to support is imposed on parents when the child is born. The duty exists regardless of whether a court has ordered a parent to pay child support. The duty to support ends when any of the following occurs: • Minority ends: -  When the child turns 18; -  When high school ends, if the child is still enrolled when he/she turns 18; • Parent-child relationship terminated: •...

Last month, Heather Tessmer wrote an article featured in MD News Magazine. The article focused on what type of professionals doctors need to protect their assets, family and business. Read the article below: You need a Professional… If you’re reading this, chances are, you yourself, are a professional. Maybe, more than a professional, you’re a specialist. If you consider yourself a specialist in your field, you understand that it takes years of training and education to reach that level in your career. You can also understand why you need other professionals on your team to help you plan for and protect your...

In a divorce, the most common professionals that come to mind are family law attorneys.   When a divorce is complex or there are high-value assets involved, there may be a need for other trained professionals. Here is a glossary of some of the professionals that could assist:   Divorce Coach Divorce coaches help clients set and achieve goals, make decisions and transition to life after the divorce. A divorce coach is not a therapist or a counselor, although he or she might be licensed as one. A divorce coach is not an attorney and does not offer legal advice.   Custody Evaluator Custody evaluators are court-appointed mental health professionals who...